Conflict

Human beings have been struggling with conflict forever. We are conflicted within ourselves and we engage in problematic conflict with others. Even though we cannot survive alone and need interaction with others to live successfully, we struggle to get along well.

Consider this: Babies who are not held and coddled do not take nourishment and die. At the same time, as soon as they grow up a bit one of their earliest words is “no.” “No” comes right along with mama or da or brr for whatever or bum for bang.

Conflict arises from inter-dependency, boundaries, needs, wants and identification or mere irritation. We have conflicts on individual, familial, societal and national levels. It never goes away and can at times be all around us.

Sometimes it is purposeful and sometimes it is meaningless. Conflict may be suppressed, or it may bubble up or it may become violent, but it doesn’t go away. If it resolved, new conflict eventually sprouts up.

We act out conflict to diffuse it by playing games and organizing competitions where we practice sportsmanship. We create laws, we make alliances, we sign treaties and we hold elections in hopes of averting conflicts that could destroy us. That is the good part of our nature. Happily, so far, we have survived conflict. But now we wonder if the newest conflicts will arise when or if humans confront alien species and we worry over how they will turn out.

Rad more from Irina at www.irinaspage.com

Big Bang and Scary Robots

While most of us believe that the universe started with a big bang, it seems that a growing number of scientists disagree with this theory. Apparently, no one really knows how the universe did start but at the beginning it was not there and then it was. Also, if the big bang or whatever started the universe, did actually happen, it happened not in space but rather inside space. The difference is that the big bang did not create the universe out of nothing; instead it started inside nothing. Some theories say the universe is inside out. Plus, it is assumed that our universe is not unique. It is merely one of many universes known as multiverses.

Whatever the universe is, there is some consensus about when it came into being: about 13.7 billion years ago. And our universe is not only expanding, but it is also speeding up. It is hard to imagine what that implies.

Hats off to scientists who venture to understand and to explain the universe. However, these same scientists tell us that artificial intelligence is much better than we are at figuring stuff like this out. Of course, artificial intelligence can only figure things out based on data we humans provide. But robots are better than we are at compiling data and using it to arrive at conclusions.

So, is the fact that artificial intelligence is superior to ours scary?

Read more from Irina Gajjar at www.irinaspage.com.

Lord Krishna Shows His Scary Form

While Lord Krishna continues -in Chapter 11 of The Gita- to overwhelm us with His all encompassing splendor, His wonderful form becomes terrible. Arjun sees that all space between heaven and earth is filled by God and that all worlds are frightened.

In this scary appearance representing Kala or Time, God demonstrates karma in process. Warriors, already doomed, rush into the Lord’s multiple mouths like

moths flying into a blazing fire. The Lord assures Arjun that he will prevail in this Great Mahabharata War.

Arjun begs God to reappear in His calm, gentle four armed form, a form which can be seen, Lord Krishna says, through endless love of Him.

Chapter 11 is one of the most dramatic chapters of the Gita. It illustrates not only the ideas, hopes and fears that human beings entertain about their Creator, but also our more sophisticated understanding of dimensions and of the confluenced integration of universes, time and space.

See, The Gita, A New Translation of Hindu Sacred Scripture, by Irina Gajjar.

Lord Krishna Shows His Gentle Form

In Chapter 11 of The Gita, in answer to Arjun’s request, God gives Arjun a divine eye. Thus empowered, Arjun sees God in His powerful beauty, with multiple faces, eyes and mouths, and with magnificent jewels weapons, garlands and clothes. His form is covered with fragrant pastes and glows with the light of a thousand suns.

Arjun perceives the entire endless universe and contained within God and he sees God without beginning, middle or end. He sees nothing but God’s overwhelming brilliance.

The verses describing this vision of the Lord put into words the emotions and thoughts of believers and devotees who try to imagine and explain their certainty about the existence of a benevolent Creator and Preserver to whom they are devoted. The descriptions bring to life ideas that are beyond description or explanation but self-evident to many.

In my opinion, the notion of God evidences a truth that is real because it lives in human hearts and minds though it cannot be quantified or qualified in expressions or images. Human notions, howsoever inexplicable, are powerful. They do not arise from nowhere and cannot be dismissed as nothing.

See, The Gita, A New Translation of Hindu Sacred Scripture, by Irina Gajjar.

Who Is a Hindu?

The question, “Who is a Hindu?” is much harder to answer than the question “What is Hinduism?”

Historians, teachers, scholars, and gurus have disagreed about Hinduism for centuries and continue to disagree. Hindus themselves agree even less about who they are and what they believe. The reason is that Hinduism, which clear and simple, is a universal faith. Hinduism has powerful tenets, but they are open to interpretation and evolving scientific truth.

Respect for individual thought runs deep. Alternatives abound. Hinduism is easy to understand for Hindus, but complex or varied explanations create confusion in the minds of those who have not absorbed or been absorbed by Hinduism. Numerous and divergent ideas, images, and theories confuse strangers to Hinduism while Hindus themselves find giving answers to outsiders difficult because they never considered the questions.

To believers or followers of Hinduism, their religion is a premise, a starting point, rather than a conclusion or ending point. Hinduism can be views as a springboard and make leaps of faith. This is why describing a Hindu as a believer in Hinduism is accurate, but at the same time incomplete and redundant.

It must be true that no Hindu believes everything that has been preached in the name of Hinduism. The majority of Hindus have not even read Bhagavad Gita or the Gita in its entirety, which is a pity as this short quintessential scripture that contains the distilled essence of Hinduism is one of the greatest writings ever written.

Yet Hindus remain staunch and sophisticated in their affiliation. Their mindset is composed of philosophy, spirituality, and ethics, all colored by ritual, mythology, and tradition.

Do You Know God?

I know all beings, past, present, and future, But they do not know Me.

Not all can see Me because their minds are covered by foolishness and desire. They are confused by opposites, like wanting and hating, and their confusion covers up the truth which is God.

Oh Arjun, people in the world do not understand Me. But the wise people, the best people, keep trying to understand God. And those who do not stop trying—every—finally know Me and My secret.

—The Gita, by Irina Gajjar

 

It’s a common thread among many people to try to know and understand God. We search for answers in different places. Even the wisest among us, don’t have all the answers. Some of the answers must be simply left to faith.

You can purchase The Gita by Irina Gajjar on Amazon or learn more about the book at http://irinaspage.com/philosophy/the-gita-sacred/

 

 

 

The Gita’s Premise

God is the Gita’s premise. Its message is that life’s purpose is to attain enlightenment and eternal bliss by merging into God. This message is a familiar one. However its new and concise formulation coalesced Hindu thought and its fresh expression has guided Hindu behavior into the twenty-first century.

In the revelation that is the Gita, God delivers His word with beauty and simplicity. This scripture contains eighteen chapters and seven hundred verses upon which uncounted commentaries have been written and continue to be written.

In the course of responding to Arjun, God as Lord Krishna unclouds Arjun’s vision, opens his mind and touches his heart. He speaks of His own nature and power, of human nature and human duty, or worlds, of knowledge, of what is knowable, of the universal and human cycles of birth, life, and death and He speaks the truth.

Questions related to these matters intersect and overlap and they give rise to further questions and answers. In the end, the Gita paints an integrated picture of our human role in the vast scheme of things that is beyond us but not beyond our wonder.

The Gita develops around the concept of a universal God who can be envisioned, though not understood on a human level, and around the idea that life’s purpose is to attain unity with God. This precept is implicit as are other fundamental beliefs like reincarnation.

When the Gita makes explicit references to such ideas that are a familiar part of Hinduism, it does so for emphasis or analogy rather than for evaluation. It reiterates them and alludes to them in different contexts, but the beliefs themselves are treated as givens, not as theories. They are considered beyond question, though not beyond interpretation:

 

She who always worships God faithfully
Crosses past the world
And becomes a part of God

(Gita 14:26)

 

This excerpt is taken from The Gita, by Irina Gajar. To learn more about the book, visit http://irinaspage.com/philosophy/the-gita-sacred/

Doing Nothing Well

It is as important to nothing well as it is to do something well. The saying goes that if something is worth doing, it is worth doing well. If something is not worth doing then we have to decide if we will not do it or not do it well, or if we will do it well anyway. However, I think that it is really important to be able to do nothing well and to take the time for doing nothing pleasurably.

When we do nothing, our minds rest. Thoughts flow. Tensions are released. We are free. It is best if we do nothing positively, but I think it is good even the negativity creeps in. Of course, we should not dwell on negativity, but we probably ought to at least acknowledge uncomfortable or even uncharitable feelings and thoughts and then find ways to dispose of them.

Read more from Irina Gajjar at www.irinaspage.com.

Faith or Reason

 

Faith is belief in the existence of something we cannot demonstrate and reason is belief in a conclusion that derives from a chain of data. I think the two go hand in hand. Together, faith and reason are the foundation of our world view, our behavior and our values.

I think these two components of human thought are mutually dependent. As different as they are, neither can exist without the other. Faith is trust in people, in our teachers, in our predecessors and in our destiny. Faith distances fear of the parade of horribles that lurks in our minds. It enables us to reason that we are likely to avoid the odds of random disasters that might wipe us out. Our reason causes us to take steps to protect ourselves, to strengthen ourselves and to inform ourselves.

Faith and reason together create the spark that encourages us to be as smart, as knowing and as kind as we can. They lead us strive to better ourselves and to be a force for good in our world.

Read more from Irina Gajjar at www.irinaspage.com

Knowledge

In Chapter 7 of the Gita, Lord Krishna speaks of knowing God. It is hard to put the meaning of knowing God or knowing anything for that matter into words. But without a doubt, there are some things we know or at least we feel like we know.

I wonder what the difference is between thinking or feeling we know and actually knowing. I suppose the distinction only makes a difference when we speak of matters which others take seriously. To opine or feel or believe that we love someone is no different from loving someone. However, when it comes to science, or politics or faith, knowledge that does not conform to what others have confirmed or what our society may lead to dangerous action.

To know is not the same as to understand or to believe. Understanding and belief often lead to knowledge, but they are not knowledge itself.

Read more from The Gita at http://irinaspage.com/philosophy/the-gita-sacred/