Who Is a Hindu?

The question, “Who is a Hindu?” is much harder to answer than the question “What is Hinduism?”

Historians, teachers, scholars, and gurus have disagreed about Hinduism for centuries and continue to disagree. Hindus themselves agree even less about who they are and what they believe. The reason is that Hinduism, which clear and simple, is a universal faith. Hinduism has powerful tenets, but they are open to interpretation and evolving scientific truth.

Respect for individual thought runs deep. Alternatives abound. Hinduism is easy to understand for Hindus, but complex or varied explanations create confusion in the minds of those who have not absorbed or been absorbed by Hinduism. Numerous and divergent ideas, images, and theories confuse strangers to Hinduism while Hindus themselves find giving answers to outsiders difficult because they never considered the questions.

To believers or followers of Hinduism, their religion is a premise, a starting point, rather than a conclusion or ending point. Hinduism can be views as a springboard and make leaps of faith. This is why describing a Hindu as a believer in Hinduism is accurate, but at the same time incomplete and redundant.

It must be true that no Hindu believes everything that has been preached in the name of Hinduism. The majority of Hindus have not even read Bhagavad Gita or the Gita in its entirety, which is a pity as this short quintessential scripture that contains the distilled essence of Hinduism is one of the greatest writings ever written.

Yet Hindus remain staunch and sophisticated in their affiliation. Their mindset is composed of philosophy, spirituality, and ethics, all colored by ritual, mythology, and tradition.

Do You Know God?

I know all beings, past, present, and future, But they do not know Me.

Not all can see Me because their minds are covered by foolishness and desire. They are confused by opposites, like wanting and hating, and their confusion covers up the truth which is God.

Oh Arjun, people in the world do not understand Me. But the wise people, the best people, keep trying to understand God. And those who do not stop trying—every—finally know Me and My secret.

—The Gita, by Irina Gajjar

 

It’s a common thread among many people to try to know and understand God. We search for answers in different places. Even the wisest among us, don’t have all the answers. Some of the answers must be simply left to faith.

You can purchase The Gita by Irina Gajjar on Amazon or learn more about the book at http://irinaspage.com/philosophy/the-gita-sacred/

 

 

 

Faith or Reason

 

Faith is belief in the existence of something we cannot demonstrate and reason is belief in a conclusion that derives from a chain of data. I think the two go hand in hand. Together, faith and reason are the foundation of our world view, our behavior and our values.

I think these two components of human thought are mutually dependent. As different as they are, neither can exist without the other. Faith is trust in people, in our teachers, in our predecessors and in our destiny. Faith distances fear of the parade of horribles that lurks in our minds. It enables us to reason that we are likely to avoid the odds of random disasters that might wipe us out. Our reason causes us to take steps to protect ourselves, to strengthen ourselves and to inform ourselves.

Faith and reason together create the spark that encourages us to be as smart, as knowing and as kind as we can. They lead us strive to better ourselves and to be a force for good in our world.

Read more from Irina Gajjar at www.irinaspage.com